Welcome to Resource

Resource

At StGiles we understand that everyone has different needs and in some instances require personalised, collaborative and holistic package of our services.

Our range of programs in Support, Respite and Therapy services can be bundled to meet individual needs.

Our Allied Health and Support teams will work closely to make sure you have the most appropriate StGiles service to meet your needs – at school, at home and in the workplace.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does it cost to use StGiles physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, social worker or psychologist?

Some services are free. Ask our team. Others can be funded by Helping Children with Autism, Better Start, and the National Disability Insurance Agency as well as Private Health Insurance

Contact Us

How do I refer? Can I self-refer? 

There are lots of ways to get an appointment at StGiles.

If you have concerns about your child’s development you can self-refer, which means you call and make an appointment for assessment.

Otherwise, your family doctor, paediatrician or even school teachers can suggest an appointment with our team.

Or, you can be referred by Child Health and Parent Services (CHAPS), Child and Family Centres and Psychology services.

How do I know if my child needs help?

You could check the Raising Children Website, visit your child health nurse, and visit a child and family centre, or your family doctor.

Who is StGiles?

StGiles started in Launceston as a child disability service in 1937. It is non-denominational, not for profit which now proudly employs Tasmania’s largest team of child health workers across physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology and psychology.

StGiles also provides disability services for adults and in home and centre based respite for children with disability.

StGiles has been operating in Hobart since 2009.

Does StGiles provide outreach services?

Yes. At St Helens, Ravenswood, Beaconsfield Early Learn Centre, Bridgewater, New Norfolk, Kingston, Cygnet, Geeveston, Clarence Plains and Sorrell child and family health centres.

Other Helpful Resourses

There are many wonderful resources on the internet. Below is a selection that you may find of interest.

Children’s development and parenting sites

Australian parenting website

Beyond Blue - Great information on depression

Brainwave.org.au - Comprehensive information on paediatric brain illnesses

Playgroup Tasmania - includes toy library information

Parenting Research Centre

Aust Government Family Assistance Office

Siblings Australia

Livewire – supportive, safe, on line communities with entertainment, chat, music and games for kids and young people living with a serious illness or disability and their parents.

Royal Children’s Hospital (Melbourne)

CCCH Centre for Community Child Health

Children’s Hospital Westmead (Sydney)

Parents/factsheets

Kidsafe Australia

Australian Human Rights Commission

Association for Children with a Disability

Association for Children with Disability, Tasmania

Canchild Centre for Childhood Disability Research (Canada)

Novitatech - Assistive technology for people with disability

Australian Paediatric Research Network

Website about rare conditions

 

Prem baby sites

Miracle Babies - This website is based in NSW and was started by parents of prem babies. Good resources for parents.

Information for parents who have a premature baby

Victorian website on prematurity

Lil' Aussie Prems

 

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy Tasmania

Cerebral Palsy Australia

Cerebral Palsy League Queensland

Aus ACPDM - Australasian Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Departmental Medicine

The Spastic Centre NSW

Scope Victoria

Novita Children’s Service and technology service, South Australia

 

Autism

Autism Association of Western Australia

FaHCSIA (Aust Govt) - Helping Children With Autism program and funding

Autism South Australia

Autism Tasmania website

ASPECT – Autism Spectrum Australia (NSW)

Autism information for parents dealing with new diagnosis

 

Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome Association of Tasmania

Down Syndrome Society of South Australia

 

Allied Health Professional websites

Speech Pathology Australia

Australian Physiotherapy Association

Occupational Therapy Australia

Australian Association of Social Workers

Current Research

StGiles Hobart implements LAMP program

Children with autism have had the opportunity to develop their language skills and some have even developed speech after participating in the St Giles Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) trial.

St Giles's Participate Assistive Technologies Service was first introduced to LAMP at the AGOSCI conference in 2011 by its developer John Halloran a Speech Pathologist from America.  He and his wife Cindy (Occupational Therapist) developed the approach by utilizing motor learning principles along with the Unity Language system. 

St Giles strives to provide evidence based practices, so after hearing about LAMP and seeing some of the emerging evidence, it was thought to be a sound approach to explore further.

After an initial trial with families in Hobart, we saw some positive results so conducted a state wide pilot project.  This pilot was conducted from 2012-2013 and following the successful results helped us decide how we would implement LAMP at St Giles.

Peter Hockley and Katie Greatbatch are now certified LAMP practioners and St Giles has endorsement from the Centre of AAC and Autism in America to conduct LAMP training

Peter Hockley is available today on: 62381888

Harrison:

  • Turned 5 in December 2014
  • We have video footage of early sessions where he can’t talk (2012)
  • He is now speaking in sentences (2014)

BACKGROUND:

Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) is a therapeutic approach based on neurological and motor learning principles.

The goal is to give individuals who are nonverbal or have limited verbal abilities a method of independently and spontaneously expressing themselves in any setting. LAMP focuses on giving the individual independent access to vocabulary on voice output AAC devices that use consistent motor plans for accessing vocabulary.

Teaching of the vocabulary happens across environments, with multisensory input to enhance meaning. The child's interests and desires help determine the vocabulary to be taught.

The LAMP approach involves five basic components: (1) Readiness to Learn, (2) Shared Engagement, (3) Consistent Motor Patterns, (4) Auditory Signals, and (5) Natural Consequences. Together these components work to achieve language connections that include the growth of vocabulary, extension of language meaning, and generalization of words & concepts to other contexts.

Individuals with autism may have dysfunction in motor planning and sensory processing which are addressed with this approach. The LAMP approach continues to be enriched with the emergence of new information in neurology and motor learning and through the successes and struggles shared by parents, therapists, and emerging communicators. We are learning together!

As a result of intervention using the LAMP approach, it is hoped that the individual will gain the ability to independently and spontaneously communicate whatever they want to say.

Learning a language takes many years for the neurologically typical individual. LAMP is not a cure. LAMP is a method for providing an individual with a language system that can progress from first words to fluent communication.

Many individuals using the LAMP approach have demonstrated success with some becoming very communicative and some increasing the amount of their verbal speech.

This is a link to the  ABC 7:30 Report  and an articale they did on our  LAMP program.

NDIA Trial, Tasmania

04.04.2014

In 2014 StGiles has 250 staff supporting 6000 families in Launceston, Hobart and Devonport with centre based therapy services, in home and centre based respite and outreach therapy clinics.

For 76 years we have demonstrated our responsiveness to unmet need by adapting our multi discipline team based model of physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy to meet evidence based best practice standards.

StGiles' focus is on early childhood intervention as well as helping children with severe disabilities to live within the family home, attend school, transition to adulthood and achieve differing but optimum levels of independence and enjoyment of life.

StGiles disability services are offered to children from birth and 17 years with any form of defined disability. Currently young people with defined disability, aged 15 and onwards, are part of the trial of the National Disability Insurance Agency in Tasmania. We are actively involved with this trial.

 

Tasmanian has Australia’s highest rate of disability at 23 per cent.

StGiles is prudent, has a high social justice ethic, a strong business model and unique team approach to early childhood and disability support services.

Current projects which require funding:

(further information available on request)

  1. Stage 2 Therapy Garden, Launceston - $150,000 – work scheduled to start 2015 – funds raised to date $50,000
  2. Stage 2 Therapy Playspace, Hobart - $110,000 – awaiting benefactor support, funds raised to date $20,000
  3. Communication Access Equipment – statewide loan pool of electronic speech aids for adults and children – ongoing – devices $7000 each.
  4. Expansion of St Giles to Burnie – immediate requirement $300,000 to purchase property.
  5. Purchase of additional supported accommodation for young people aged 15 to 24 to meet unmet need Launceston - $400,000 property in Peel Street, Launceston identified.

Other Helpful Resources

There are many wonderful resources on the internet. Below is a selection that you may find of interest.

Children’s development and parenting sites

Australian parenting website

Beyond Blue - Great information on depression

Brainwave.org.au - Comprehensive information on paediatric brain illnesses

Playgroup Tasmania - includes toy library information

Parenting Research Centre

Aust Government Family Assistance Office

Siblings Australia

Livewire – supportive, safe, on line communities with entertainment, chat, music and games for kids and young people living with a serious illness or disability and their parents.

Royal Children’s Hospital (Melbourne)

CCCH Centre for Community Child Health

Children’s Hospital Westmead (Sydney)

Parents/factsheets

Kidsafe Australia

Australian Human Rights Commission

Association for Children with a Disability

Association for Children with Disability, Tasmania

Canchild Centre for Childhood Disability Research (Canada)

Novitatech - Assistive technology for people with disability

Australian Paediatric Research Network

Website about rare conditions

Prem baby sites

Miracle Babies - This website is based in NSW and was started by parents of prem babies. Good resources for parents.

Information for parents who have a premature baby

Victorian website on prematurity

Lil' Aussie Prems

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy Tasmania

Cerebral Palsy Australia

Cerebral Palsy League Queensland

Aus ACPDM - Australasian Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Departmental Medicine

The Spastic Centre NSW

Scope Victoria

Novita Children’s Service and technology service, South Australia

Autism

Autism Association of Western Australia

FaHCSIA (Aust Govt) - Helping Children With Autism program and funding

Autism South Australia

Autism Tasmania website

ASPECT – Autism Spectrum Australia (NSW)

Autism information for parents dealing with new diagnosis

Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome Association of Tasmania

Down Syndrome Society of South Australia

Allied Health Professional websites

Speech Pathology Australia

Australian Physiotherapy Association

Occupational Therapy Australia

Australian Association of Social Workers